End of the road …

end of the road sign
Photo: R. Hopkins

“There was something about being at the end of the road that attracted strange people… They came and, when the exotic became familiar, they departed, leaving their messes behind.”

From Cedar, Salmon and Weed, p. 237

 
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Introducing the Blog!

bamariel_02
Arial view of Bamfield inlet. Photo: Colin Bates
Why Bamfield, then and now? We all came to Bamfield for a reason: witness protection programs, avoiding alimony payments, lack of anything better to do, fishing. Is the Bamfield that attracted you the scene that sucked in the (us! Ouch, that hurts) old-timers? This blog explores that nebulous place, hopefully with your help. Writing Cedar, Salmon and Weed tweaked my interest in portraying the Bamfield of old, or at least of the 1970s. Are there modern-day equivalents to the waxed oil stove, the drying rack dangling from the living room ceiling, the shelves of home canned tomatoes and salmon overlooking an army of black gumboots on the back deck, the ever ready cribbage board, the ashtray? Consider the progress in our telephone service. In the 1970s, you dialed 3-33xx. For example, 3-3336 got you the Jennings. Today, thanks to technological advances, you dial 250-728-3336 to get the Jennings. In all fairness, progress is not all bad. Today Port Alberni is a local call (the reverse is not), whereas earlier it was long-distance. And make certain you have a plugged in telephone for those power outages. The modern-day Bamfield power outage can result from a car accident or a downed tree anywhere on Bamfield Main, or some mishap in Port Alberni or beyond. In the 1970s Bamfield generated it own power and all outages resulted from local accidents. A tree shorted a power line; the obstacle was removed; the power switched back on … all by a local who wanted his power back …now. We all have a Bamfield, then and now, in our lives, it might be in Northern Ontario, Southern California, or a hidden room in the basement. Let’s explore and share.  (Use the comment box below.)
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